A Colorado man tragically passed away while searching for an elusive New Mexico hidden treasure. Now his father wants to make sure it doesn't happen again.

31 year-old Colorado resident Eric Ashby and his friends back in June decided to try their luck to go search for a $2 million treasure hidden somewhere in New Mexico. Forrest Fenn's treasure is allegedly worth $2 million dollars and includes gold, jewels, rare coins and other valuables. Forrest Fenn was diagnosed with cancer and thought he was going to pass away. The author and art dealer wanted to help get people to go out and enjoy the beauty of New Mexico. He hid the treasure chest somewhere in New Mexico and in his autobiography, "The Thrill Of The Chase," Fenn included a poem that contained clues to the location of the treasure. Since the release of his book, he has given out additional clues as to where the treasure is hidden.

Tragically, Ashby is the 3rd person to die while searching for the treasure. Ashby and three friends were treasure hunting in a raft on the Arkansas River in Colorado's Royal Gorge June 28th when they had an accident. According to the Denver Channel, the raft flipped and while the other three companions were able to get safely to shore, Ashby got entangled in the raft's ropes and slipped beneath the water's surface. Paul Ashby, Eric's father, provided DNA to see if a body found a month later downstream was his son's. On Friday, that body's identity was confirmed, according to the Albuquerque Journal.

Now that his son's body has been found, Paul Ashby has a new mission: to get "Eric's Law" passed in the state of Colorado. Eric's Law would require witnesses to report life-threatening situations to the police. When his son died, his friends reportedly fled the scene, even after one of them saw Ashby clinging to a rock. To the senior Ashby, if he can get this law passed his son's life can now save lives, "that takes away the injustice because all of a sudden Eric's life can save a life. This bill could help save lives and that's all that matters." Paul Ashby stated.