By now, you know all about the tiger seen roaming in a Houston neighborhood. Tigergate as it's being called, gets weird.  Just in case you missed it, check out this video below.

Can you imagine just watching some Netflix when suddenly you look out and see a big ol' tiger on the street? That wasn't even the craziest part of the story!

Apparently the tiger, who is named India and is nine months old, was loaded onto an SUV by a man who drove off with the tiger! According to the Houston Police Department, they arrested the suspect but the tiger is still at large. The suspect, 26-year-old Victor Hugo Cuevas was arrested and charged with felony evading arrest for fleeing from Houston police- he was also out on bail in connection with a 2017 murder charge, so there's that. The investigation into the tiger portion of this situation is still under investigation.

You may be asking yourself, is it legal to have a pet tiger? In Texas, the answer is yes. HOWEVER, tigers are not allowed within Houston city limits unless the handler, such as a zoo, is licensed to have exotic animals.

Now, Carole Baskin, founder of Big Cat Rescue, is blaming Texas Senators Ted Cruz and John Cornyn for the missing tiger. In an interview with CNN, Baskin said that if the Senators had just signed onto the Big Cat Safety Act last year, which the House passed but was never brought up for a vote in the Senate, this wouldn't have happened.

"I really hope that Senators Cruz and Cornyn will sign onto the Big Cat Public Safety Act, because if they had last year when the House passed this bill – the Senate didn’t bring it up for a vote – this wouldn’t have happened."

The Big Cat Public Safety Act would crack down on the breeding and ownership of exotic pets like lions and tigers and would have made it illegal to keep one as a house pet.

Upon hearing that he was to blame for this, Cruz Tweeted out this response:

No response from John Cornyn, though.

I'm all for blaming Ted Cruz on this one, too!

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