A former Texas State Guard officer is crying foul after she says she was 'fat shamed' and kicked out of the Guard. According to KXAN-TV:

“I don’t understand why they’re kicking out people that gained weight?” said Lt. Col. Cendy Brister-Antley. “Are we suddenly less intelligent, because we gained weight?”

Brister-Antley sought out the TV station to change the policies of the Guard. She told the station the Guard did not follow their rules when they discharged her saying her body mass index was under 40, which automatically triggers an honorable discharge. She told the station her BMI is 39.98.

I don't know about this. It seems like this former officer is just looking for attention. The CDC says a BMI of 30 is obese and 40 is considered 'severely' obese. She's right on the edge of being severely obese. She knows their policy. It requires you to be in shape and she is not.

Brister-Antley is a nurse. As a nurse, you would think she would be concerned about her weight. The story says she had been with the Texas State Guard for 13 years. She should've taken action to avoid getting such a high body mass index to avoid being discharged.

The story also says she was discharged back in February. Why did she seek out the news media 8 months after she was discharged? She could've been dropping some weight during that time.

An investigation into Brister-Antley's discharge was conducted by the Inspector General of the Texas Military Department. The report ultimately agreed with her dismissal according to KXAN.

We'd like to hear your thoughts, your reaction, and your opinion on this story. Do you feel this officer was 'fat shamed' or do you feel she was properly discharged? Tell us what you think on Facebook or on our station app.

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Stacker used data from the 2020 County Health Rankings to rank every state's average life expectancy from lowest to highest. The 2020 County Health Rankings values were calculated using mortality counts from the 2016-2018 National Center for Health Statistics. The U.S. Census 2019 American Community Survey and America's Health Rankings Senior Report 2019 data were also used to provide demographics on the senior population of each state and the state's rank on senior health care, respectively.

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