Last week we told you about the magical views at Salt Flats but it looks like the fun is over thanks to some unruly tourists.

Last week we told you how the torrential rain in West Texas had caused several areas to flood inside the city limits including streets, fields, McKelligan Canyon and plenty of homes. There was a lot of damage from the rain and many homes and other buildings flooded from the rushing water.

Another area that flooded were the salt flats in Hudspeth County, Texas. Located about two hours from El Paso, the Salt Flats area is an area that's covered with salt and other minerals. The area shines in the sun and offers a beautiful landscape, which is perfect for pictures.

We posted a story of some of the beautiful photos of the Salt Flats and people posing in the beautiful waters. From there, people started becoming obsessed with the stunning views and started heading out there to see the sight for themselves.

While the idea was initially just to show more of the beautiful sights, the stories coming from that area continue to be worrisome. People are heading out there to grill, drink, and hang out for several hours. On top of that, there aren't any restroom facilities and people have been using the desert as their own personal toilet. Now, the Hudspeth County Sheriff is putting a stop to all the shenanigans out in the desert. They released this state on their Facebook, warning people to stop trespassing on private property by Salt Flats:

"Recently we have experienced an influx of visitors to the salt flats near highway 62/180. Although we agree it is beautiful scenery, the large groups of people has caused some issues. Most of the salt flats is privately owned and we have already received notification from land owners that they do not want anyone on their property. Deputies will be in the area, Violators will be given a trespassing warning/citation if caught on private property."

25 True Crime Locations: What Do They Look Like Today?

Below, find out where 25 of the most infamous crimes in history took place — and what the locations are used for today. (If they've been left standing.)