We've been hit with some serious rain in the Borderland the past few days and it's led to some flooding. There is some sad news to report as a woman who was hiking on the Franklin Mountains yesterday was found dead after she was swept away in the flood. Fire officials say the 39-year-old woman slipped on a rock and ended up falling down the mountain, ultimately being swept away by rushing water.

The woman's body was recovered at 1000 block of Thunderbird in West El Paso. Family members told ABC-7 that the woman was visiting El Paso from Austin.

One thing to remember is that it doesn't take a ton of water to sweep you or your car away in a flood. According to weather.gov:

Statistics clearly point out the high risk of driving in and around flooded roads and low spots. Usually, individuals between the ages of 30-39 years old attempt to drive through flooded roads only to be wisked away by rushing waters. The rule is simple: if you cannot see the road or its line markings, do not drive through the water.

Just how much water can take your car away? According to idrivesafely.com:

Six inches of water is enough to hit the bottom of most passenger cars, flooding the exhaust and leaving you immobile. If you cannot walk through water (especially moving water), do not attempt to drive across it. It doesn’t take much for most cars to float. And even the deepest tire tread can’t give you a gecko-like grip that will keep you grounded.

 

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